We recently posted a Blog comparing LCD vs. Plasma Screen televisions. I found that one of the most surprising differences made during this review was in relation to energy usage.

LCD screens typically use about 40 percent less energy than plasma screen TVs. I found that to be a remarkable difference and strong selling point for the LCD. Most households use their TV’s on a daily basis– a forty percent difference over a 30 day month could really add-up.

It also got me thinking about other household appliances and their usage. How much juice do my appliances and electronics really use? How much do they need? And how can I conserve, upgrade, or refocus my energy usage to reduce the overall consumption costs?

The answer might be surprising to you. I found that everyday appliances often have startling difference in usage cost. A detailed table of appliance use can be found here.

In addition, electronics also have a comparable power usage by type. See below.

Item

Average Kilowatt Use

Annual Cost

Televisions

Plasma TV

441

$48.25

CRT TV

123

$13.46

LCD TV

77

$8.42

Television Accessories

DVR / TiVO

363

$39.71

Digital Cable

239

$26.15

Satellite Cable

124

$13.57

Video Game Console

16

$1.57

DVD Player

13

$1.42

Computers

Desktop

255

$27.90

Laptop

83

$9.08

Computer Accessories

CRT Computer Monitor

82

$8.97

LCD Computer Monitor

70

$7.66

Modem

50

$5.47

Wireless Router

48

$5.25

Computer Speakers

20

$2.19

Most surprisingly, I found that almost all appliances and electronics are drawing some form of power in their ‘off’ or ‘stand-by’ modes. A detailed overview of exactly how much power is being lost per item can be found here. Often, the best solution for this common power drain is to simply plug your electronics into power strip and flip off when not in use.

Overall, I found the energy comparisons of electronics and appliances very extensive. They can vary by type, brand, or even configuration. I recommend doing some quick searches of your own to find the solutions most relevant to you. But definitely take the time to do the research. You could really make a difference in not only your overall energy conservation, but in your wallet as well.